Ask Marvin Lundy…About How to Buy Motorcycle Insurance

It’s spring. You’re looking forward to getting on the road. But, what happens if you’re in an accident? You may be the safest rider in the world, but what about the other guy? Who will pay your bills if you get hurt?

Buying motorcycle insurance can be tricky. The rules are different state to state and policies can vary widely, so you have to know what you’re buying.

To help you, I have put together a short list of things you need to know about motorcycle insurance. Read it. If you get into an accident, you’ll be glad you did.

The Biggest Mistake
The biggest mistake that you can make is not buying enough insurance. Saving a few dollars on your policy can cost you big time if you get into an accident.

I’m sure you know that motorcycle accidents can be devastating. From road rash and broken bones to spinal injury and head trauma, an accident can leave you with a long hospital stay. With the average week in the hospital costing over $50,000, your insurance can run out very quickly.

With this in mind, we recommend that you purchase as much insurance as you can afford, and certainly more than the minimum that state laws require.

The Second Biggest Mistake

The second biggest mistake that you can make is to purchase motorcycle insurance without understanding your policy. Common insurance terms can trip you up, so here are a few that you need to know.

Full Tort vs. Limited Tort:
Full Tort coverage refers to your ability to receive compensation from someone who may be legally responsible, or liable, for injuries suffered in an accident.

Luckily for you, the state of Pennsylvania does not require you to pay extra for full tort threshold motorcycle insurance like it does for normal automobile insurance. The same goes for Delaware; the full tort threshold is included with any motor vehicle insurance policy. However, this is not the case in NJ, where you MUST select the “No Limitation on Lawsuit option” in order to have a reasonable expectation of being compensated for any pain and suffering inflicted upon you by the negligence of others.

Bodily Injury Liability Coverage:
Bodily Injury Liability coverage provides benefits to pay claims against the policyholder if he or she is found legally responsible for causing an accident.

Medical Expense Benefits Coverage:
This coverage typically pays medical, hospital, lost-income and disability expenses on behalf of the policyholder.

UM/UIM:
Uninsured Motorist covers you are injured by a driver who carries no insurance. Underinsured Motorist covers you if you are injured by a driver who has inadequate insurance to pay the claim.

How Much Insurance Should You Buy?

If you live in Pennsylvania

Bodily Injury Liability Coverage: Lundy Law STRONGLY recommends that you purchase the maximum limit of 100/300.

Why?

You will quickly exceed the limits of your coverage, leaving you responsible for the difference.

Medical Expense Benefits Coverage:

Not having enough medical expense benefits coverage can leave you at risk if you run out of coverage. Lundy Law STRONGLY recommends that you purchase as much Medical Expense Benefits Coverage as you are able to.

Why?

With motorcycle accidents typically resulting in over $34,000 in medical costs, your coverage will run out very quickly. Make sure you are protected.

Oh, and by the way, the average cost increases to $40,000 for riders who don’t wear helmets, to say nothing of the long-term effects of head trauma. I’m not here to nag, but do yourself a favor. Wear a helmet. OK?

Uninsured Motorist/Underinsured Motorist (UM/UIM):
It’s a big mistake not to carry UM/UIM coverage. To make sure you are covered if the “other guy” doesn’t have insurance, Lundy Law STRONGLY recommends carrying 100/300.

Why?

Do I really have to tell you to protect yourself against the “other guy”?

If you live in New Jersey —

Firstly, keep in mind that the selection you make on your auto insurance policy as pertains to the Limitation on Lawsuit/No Limitation on Lawsuit option determines your status if you are injured while riding on a motorcycle, meaning that if you have an auto insurance policy, you MUST have the No Limitation on Lawsuits option in order for you to have a reasonable expectation of being compensated for any pain and suffering inflicted upon you by the negligence of others.

If you do not have an auto insurance policy, be sure to select the No Limitation on Lawsuits option on your motorcycle insurance policy. It may sound grim, but assume that you will be an accident at some point when you consider your coverage, and plan accordingly.

Bodily Injury Liability Coverage:
Lundy Law STRONGLY recommends that you purchase the maximum of 100/300. Why? Again, you will very quickly exceed the minimum if you get into an accident, leaving you financially responsible.

Medical Expense Benefits Coverage:
Not having enough medical expense benefits coverage can leave you at risk if you run out of coverage. Lundy Law STRONGLY recommends that you purchase as much Medical Expense Benefits Coverage as you are able to.

Why?

With motorcycle accidents typically resulting in over $34,000 in medical costs, your coverage will run out very quickly. Make sure you are protected.

Uninsured Motorist/Underinsured Motorist (UM/UIM):
Lundy Law STRONGLY recommends that you purchase at least 100/300 in UM/UIM insurance. Also, make sure you go over this with your insurance agent who sold you or speak with a rep from your auto carrier. Policy exclusions can vary from carrier to carrier and you can very quickly find yourself in a tight spot if you’re not careful.

For example, we have seen an instance where an individual who had an automobile policy in her name was injured while she was a passenger on a motorcycle operated by her husband. He was fault and his motorcycle carrier covered only the $15,000 minimum liability limit. She wanted to pursue the 100/300 in UIM coverage on her auto policy, but her carrier denied the coverage because of the following exclusion: “Underinsured Motorist does not include a motorcycle owned by a resident relative.”

Lesson: know your policy exclusions before you put yourself at risk. Also, work carefully with your broker when setting it up.

If you live in Delaware —

Bodily Injury Liability Coverage:
Lundy Law STRONGLY recommends at least 100/300 in bodily injury liability coverage so that you don’t exceed your coverage.

Medical Expense Benefits Coverage:
Again, Lundy Law STRONGLY recommends that you purchase as much Medical Expense Benefits Coverage as you are able to.

Uninsured Motorist/Underinsured Motorist (UM/UIM):
Lundy Law STRONGLY recommends that you get the maximum allowable, which is 100/300. However, be aware that UM/UIM cannot exceed your bodily injury liability coverage you purchased. In other words, you need to have 100/300 in Bodily Injury Liability in order to have 100/300 in UM/UIM.

Remember, while choosing minimum coverage can save you a few dollars now, it can cost you plenty later. If you’re not sure about your motorcycle coverage in Pennsylvania, New Jersey or Delaware, talk to the motorcycle injury law experts at Lundy Law.

We’ll steer you straight.

CLICK HERE FOR A FREE CONSULTATION

Fill out this form to receive a free initial consultation.

Name

Phone

Email

Message

CALL ME NOW!


Please leave this field empty.

Please leave this field empty.
icon